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Why do we have an Danville Architectural Heritage Board?

     (a)     The city commission finds that buildings within the city having historic, architectural or cultural value have been significantly altered or destroyed notwithstanding the feasibility and desirability of preserving these buildings or altering them in an appropriate way.

     (b)     The commission finds that the historic and architectural character of the city is of vital importance in maintaining the economy.

     (c)     The commission finds that the city has played an important role in the development of Kentucky and that the history of the city is shown today through buildings representing the activities and events during its growth.  The commission finds that the city has buildings that represent the persons who live or have lived in the city during a period of more than one hundred (100) years.  It is the finding of the city commission that the distinctive and significant character of the city can only be maintained by protecting and enhancing its historic, architectural and cultural heritage and by preventing unnecessary injury to its historic districts and its landmarks which are civic and community assets.

     (d)     The commission finds that the federal and Kentucky governments have passed laws to protect historic districts and landmarks and that the national Historic Preservation Act was amended in 1980 to establish a certified local government program creating a new federal-state-local partnership to encourage the efforts by cities to protect and preserve their historic districts and landmarks.

     (e)     The commission finds that the adoption of this article to provide a historic preservation program will benefit all the residents of the city and all the owners of property.

     (f)     The city commission declares as a matter of public policy that the preservation, protection and use of historic districts and landmarks are a public benefit because  they  have  a special character and  historic, architectural, and cultural value and thus serve as visible reminds of the history and heritage of this city, state, and nation.  The commission declares as a matter of public policy that this article is required in the interest of the health, prosperity, safety, welfare and economic well-being of the people.

     (g)     The commission finds that the Main Street program has contributed to the revival of the central business district and has increased the awareness of the value of the older buildings in the city.  The commission also finds that the historic preservation program will strengthen the current revitalization work in the city.

     (h)     The purpose of this article is to effect the goals as set forth in the above findings and declarations of public policy and specifically, but not exclusively, to:

          (1)     Effect and accomplish the preservation, protection and use of the historic districts and individual landmarks which have a special character and historic, architectural and cultural value to the city, state and nation;

          (2)     Promote the educational, cultural, economic and general welfare of the people and safeguard the city's history and heritage as embodied and reflected in its historic districts and landmarks;

          (3)     Stabilize and improve property values in such districts and the city as a whole;

          (4)     Foster civic pride in the value of notable accomplishments of the past;

          (5)     Strengthen the economy of the city;

          (6)     Protect and enhance the city's attractions to residents and visitors; and

          (7)     Enhance the visual and aesthetic character, diversity and interest of the city.

 


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